Alzheimer’s disease drug developed at Roskamp Institute approved for key clinical trial funding in Europe

Nilvadipine, an Alzheimer’s drug developed at the Roskamp Institute in Sarasota announced earlier this year was selected for funding or a large-scale European clinical trial. An international research consortium led by Trinity College Dublin (Ireland) announced more than 500 patients will participate in the multicenter Phase III clinical trial designed to study the effectiveness of Nilvadipine.

Michael Mullan, M.D., Ph.D., Roskamp Institute director who, with associate director Fiona Crawford, Ph.D and lead scientist Daniel Paris, Ph.D., led the research team that developed the drug. Mullan said, “We need many more medicines to move forward into advanced clinical trials in the fight against Alzheimer’s Disease and we are pleased the Roskamp institute has played such a major role in the development of this drug.” Before a drug can move into clinical practice, Phase III is usually the last step in the regulatory process.

The clinical trials will take place in Europe, where Brian Lawlor, M.D., Connolly Norman Professor of Old Age Psychiatry at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, will be principal investigator and coordinator. The study will be funded by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme and more than 20 European clinical sites will participate. Nilvadipine is already approved for the use in mild cases of hypertension (high blood pressure) and Mullan says, “The process can move more quickly in Europe, and the study findings may help accelerate the process with the U.S food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Mullan and Crawford have been studying Alzheimer’s disease for more than 20 years, moving from the UK to Florida in 1991 and to Sarasota in 2003 to establish the Roskamp Institute. “Some of our recent studies have involved Sarasota area residents, who have contributed to our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease and helped move the development process forward,” said Crawford. Now, the Roskamp Institute will provide research support for the Phase III clinical trial, such as assessing genetic and other markers for Alzheimer’s disease in study participants.

For more information on Alzheimer’s Disease please visit www.mullanalzheimer.com

Or http://mullanalzheimer.info

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Roskamp institute studies may lead to better diagnosis

Researchers at the Roskamp Institute have new studies that could lead to better diagnosis and eventual treatment for U.S. military personnel as well as other patients with TBI, commonly known as traumatic brain injuries.

Fiona Crawford, Ph.D., associate director of the Institute, a leading research facility for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders says, “We have found that there are changes in blood proteins that occur after a head injury, and that these are dependent on the severity of the injury, the time since the injury and genetic factors influencing outcomes after head injury.” Crawford’s research indicates that TBI can affect cellular mechanisms in the brain long after the original trauma, and that blood biomarkers reflect these ongoing processes. She also stated, “Translating these finding from the laboratory to human patients may help clinicians determine the extent of the brain injury, how long ago the injury occurred and the patient’s prognosis for a favorable or a poor outcome.”

Traumatic brain injury has multiple consequences at the cellular level and so molecular changes can persist for weeks and months after the initial brain swelling and other immediate issues have resolved. Crawford says, “Identifying blood biomarkers of mild TBI would improve medical management by enabling us to identify patients who need treatment or intervention, even if they do not have obvious signs of a brain injury.” The U.S. Department of Defense, and the Veterans Administration supports all of Crawford’s work because it could lead to better diagnosis of military personnel with mild brain injuries and better long-term care of our veterans.

For more information on Alzheimer’s Disease please visit www.mullanalzheimer.com

Or http://mullanalzheimer.info

Or http://www.rfdn.org

Research Highlights The Direct Causes Related To The Disease

Alzheimer’s disease affects patients over 65 years of age and is classified as a type of dementia. However, the less prevalent early-onset Alzheimer’s can also occur earlier than 65 years of age as shown by several researches. As per the 2006 statistics, there were 26.6 million patients of Alzheimer’s and it is estimated that the disease will affect 1 in 85 people globally by 2050. Presently, there are no cures available for the disease and it is estimated to get worse with age gradually leading to death. Alzheimer’s is calculated to affect a person’s memory, affects the ability to learn and also types of behavioral changes.

Dr. Michael Mullan is a highly accredited biomedical professional and has contributed vastly to the field of research on neurodegenerative disorders conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. He is chaired as the Director at Roskamp Institute. He is based in Sarasota, Florida, and is exceptionally qualified in finding cures for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and addictions. The Roskamp Institute utilizes superior scientific approaches along with Dr. Mullan to understand the root causes and potential therapies of disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. Aside researching on Alzheimer’s, the institute has successfully studied other illnesses and disorders such as Gulf War Illness, Brain Research, etc.

With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, science has come to a better understanding of the disease and of developing its prospective cures. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research proves that one of the direct causes related to the disease is the excess accumulation of beta-amyloid which is a type of protein in the brain. It is noticed that the protein is produced in every human, but its excess accumulation can result in Alzheimer’s. Along with the team, Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research has tested many medications and therapeutic treatments to help slowing down the accumulation of beta-amyloid and associated inflammation.

About Dr Michael Mullan

Dr Michael Mullan has been working in the biomedical field for many years. He is a leading researcher with special expertise in assessment of the earliest cognitive symptoms and stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Mullan’s Alzheimer research works are also published in various articles which help students and researchers for making new discoveries. Find out more about his Alzheimer research works, by browsing through www.rfdn.org or www.mullanalzheimer.com or www.mullanalzheimer.info.

Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer Research Involved Studying Brain Proteins

The Roskamp Institute has surfaced as a leading and reputable non-for-profit biomedical research organization. It has successfully experimented to find cures for several neurodegenerative disorders and conditions like Alzheimer’s disease. Through the clinical trials division and outpatient clinic, at the institute, thousands of Alzheimer’s patients get superior services and therapeutic treatments. Dr. Michael Mullan is the Director of Roskamp Institute. Dr. Mullan is an experienced and a competent individual. His research efforts led to the identification of Swiss Mutation.

Along with Dr. Mullan, the institute has helped in contributing to provide insights on the treatments of neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer, traumatic brain injury, substance abuse, etc. through unparalleled research. Under the supervision and guidance of Dr. Michael Mullan, several causes and cures related to Alzheimer’s disease have been found. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research identified various types of genetic variations which may be the cause of predispose humans to this disease. His research and study identified that the central reason to the disease process is a small protein known as ß (beta)-amyloid. The excess and abnormal accumulation of ß-amyloid in the brain results in Alzheimer’s disease. With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, cutting edge cures, medications, and therapeutic treatments are tested and developed to help slow down the process of ß-amyloid’s toxic accumulation.

As per the research on Dr Mullan’s Alzheimer, Aβ peptide is responsible for preventing blood vessel growth and inhibiting tumor growth. He studied several particular sequences within the Alzheimer’s Aβ peptide to identify if Aβ can have the same effect with short derivatives as well. The research proved that the peptide has potential therapeutic relevance to prevent the growth of tumor. The research involved conducting clinical trials which are specifically conducted to developing superior treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. In order to understand the diseases and finding its causes and prevention, Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research work has contributed extraordinarily in the field. Furthermore, with his constant efforts and guidance, the Roskamp Institute was also able to carry out research in neuropsychiatric disorders such as Traumatic Brain Research, Gulf War Illness, and Alzheimer’s. Find out more about his Alzheimer research works, by browsing through www.rfdn.org or www.mullanalzheimer.com or www.mullanalzheimer.info.

The Roskamp Institute publish data suggesting that plant pigments might be helpful in Alzheimer’s disease.

A team of researchers at the Roskamp Institute in Sarasota, Florida lead by Drs. Daniel Paris and Michael Mullan have shown that plant pigments known as flavonoids are able to reduce the toxic amyloid peptide that accumulates in Alzheimer’s disease. Flavonoids are a family of plant pigments responsible for the color of petals of many plants. it has long been suggested that flavonoids may have potential therapeutic effects. Cell based studies have previously shown that they can exert anti-alergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and potentially anti-cancer effects. Flavonoids are taken in quite large amounts by animals and are included in some human diet. The team at the Roskamp Institute are interested in lowering the production of amyloid the Alzheimer peptide associated with the disease. Drs. Paris, Mullan and colleagues have showed that in cell culture flavonoids can lower the production of amyloid. This appears to occur via the inhibition of the enzyme which makes amyloid. This enzyme, called NFkB, is ubiquitously expressed in cells including neurons. The research suggests that some invivo (animal testing) of flavonoids might be the next step to determine whether they have a potential role in treating Alzheimer’s.

The Roskamp Institute is a not-for-profit, stand alone, research institute located in Sarasota, Florida. Under the leadership of Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford, the institute has focused its activities on developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. The paper on flavonoids and Alzheimer’s Abeta was published in the Journal of Bioinformation in 2011.

Bioinformation. 2011;6(6):229-36. Epub 2011 Jun 6.
Flavonoids lower Alzheimer’s Aβ production via an NF-KB dependent mechanism. Paris D, Mathura V, Ait-Ghezala G, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Patel N, Bachmeier C, Mullan M.

For more information please visit:

<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>

<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>
http://mullanalzheimer.tumblr.com

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid

The Roskamp Institute publish data suggesting that plant pigments might be helpful in Alzheimer’s disease.

A team of researchers at the Roskamp Institute in Sarasota, Florida lead by Drs. Daniel Paris and Michael Mullan have shown that plant pigments known as flavonoids are able to reduce the toxic amyloid peptide that accumulates in Alzheimer’s disease. Flavonoids are a family of plant pigments responsible for the color of petals of many plants. it has long been suggested that flavonoids may have potential therapeutic effects. Cell based studies have previously shown that they can exert anti-alergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and potentially anti-cancer effects. Flavonoids are taken in quite large amounts by animals and are included in some human diet. The team at the Roskamp Institute are interested in lowering the production of amyloid the Alzheimer peptide associated with the disease. Drs. Paris, Mullan and colleagues have showed that in cell culture flavonoids can lower the production of amyloid. This appears to occur via the inhibition of the enzyme which makes amyloid. This enzyme, called NFkB, is ubiquitously expressed in cells including neurons. The research suggests that some invivo (animal testing) of flavonoids might be the next step to determine whether they have a potential role in treating Alzheimer’s.

The Roskamp Institute is a not-for-profit, stand alone, research institute located in Sarasota, Florida. Under the leadership of Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford, the institute has focused its activities on developing new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. The paper on flavonoids and Alzheimer’s Abeta was published in the Journal of Bioinformation in 2011.

Bioinformation. 2011;6(6):229-36. Epub 2011 Jun 6.
Flavonoids lower Alzheimer’s Aβ production via an NF-KB dependent mechanism. Paris D, Mathura V, Ait-Ghezala G, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Patel N, Bachmeier C, Mullan M.

For more information please visit:

<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>

<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>
http://mullanalzheimer.tumblr.com

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid