Characterization and use of human brain microvascular endothelial cells to examine β-amyloid exchange in the blood-brain barrier. Bachmeier C, Mullan M, Paris D.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by excessive cerebrovascular deposition of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). The investigation of Aβ transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been hindered by inherent limitations in the cellular systems currently used to model the BBB, such as insufficient barrier properties and poor reproducibility. In addition, many of the existing models are not of human or brain origin and are often arduous to establish and maintain. Thus, we characterized an in vitro model of the BBB employing human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and evaluated its utility to investigate Aβ exchange at the blood-brain interface. Our HBMEC model offers an ease of culture compared with primary isolated or coculture BBB models and is more representative of the human brain endothelium than many of the cell lines currently used to study the BBB. In our studies, the HBMEC model exhibited barrier properties comparable to existing BBB models as evidenced by the restricted permeability of a known paracellular marker. In addition, using a simple and rapid fluormetric assay, we showed that antagonism of key Aβ transport proteins significantly altered the bi-directional transcytosis of fluorescein-Aβ (1-42) across the HBMEC model. Moreover, the magnitude of these effects was consistent with reports in the literature using the same ligands in existing in vitro models of the BBB. These studies establish the HBMEC as a representative in vitro model of the BBB and offer a rapid fluorometric method of assessing Aβ exchange between the periphery and the brain.

or more information on the Roskamp Institute and Alzheimer’s please visit:

http://www.mullanalzheimer.com

http://www.mullanalzheimer.info

http://www.michaelmullan.us

www.rfdn.org

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Selective dihydropyiridine compounds facilitate the clearance of β-amyloid across the blood-brain barrier.

Increasing evidence suggests that the soluble form of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Previously, we reported that treatment with certain antihypertensive dihydropyridine (DHP) compounds can mitigate Aβ production in whole cells and reduce brain Aβ burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. As Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key regulatory step in the deposition of Aβ in the brain, we examined the effect of DHP treatment on Aβ brain clearance. Treatment with certain DHP compounds significantly increased Aβ(1-42) transcytosis across the BBB in an in vitro model. The rank order of these compounds was nitrendipine>nicardipine=cilnidipine=lercanidipine>nimodipine>azelnidipine=nilvadipine. Conversely, amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, and nifedipine had no effect on Aβ(1-42) BBB transcytosis. In an in vivo paradigm of Aβ clearance across the BBB, peripheral administration of nitrendipine, cilnidipine, and nilvadipine to wild-type animals facilitated the brain clearance of centrally administered exogenous Aβ(1-42), whereas with amlodipine, there was no effect. We also observed improved cognitive function in mice treated with nilvadipine following central Aβ(1-42) insult. Thus, in addition to the effect of certain DHP compounds on Aβ production, we demonstrate that certain DHP compounds also facilitate the clearance of Aβ across the BBB. This dual mechanism of action may be particularly effective in attenuating Aβ brain burden in Alzheimer’s disease and could open the door to a new class of therapies for the treatment of this disease.

for more information on the Roskamp Institute and Alzheimer’s please visit:

http://www.mullanalzheimer.com

http://www.mullanalzheimer.info

http://www.michaelmullan.us

www.rfdn.org